Skip to main content

INDEPENDENT SONG RELEASE: Best Intentions, “At the Ocean”


Best Intentions is a cherry-faced, four-member pop punk band busting out of Nashville. Their new single "At the Ocean" is from their forthcoming as-yet untitled album, which they’re hoping to release this summer.

The song's music video (above) finds the guys playing in a house that seems half-suburban, half-Gothic with lots of interior wood paneling. The lights are off and the boys are illuminated starkly by multiple flashlights playing over them, as if they were playing in the dark before being discovered. Interspersed with this are shots of a cute girl on the beach, exuding nerd-girl sensuality, her hoodie kept over her head because she’s shy and because she's a flashback.

The boys in the band look like guys you would want to have a beer with and talk about how much Bukowski and Shakespeare actually have in common. However, they retain a Seth Rogen-ish Everyguy appeal. No big hair or studded clothing here. Just close friends rocking out in their parent’s house. Or someone’s house.

There’s Tony Pietrafesa wearing the black cap, singing and playing guitar with Matthew Kleinman on the other guitar. Evan Aliquo plays his bass like a violent dance partner while Jim Collett beats the drums and you can completely tell that nothing makes him happier. Their sound is very Blink 182'ish, though cleaner and less conspiracy-heavy.

The video goes on to show Pietrafesa driving to the beach to meet the cute girl (quite the quest since Nashville is nearly 900 miles from the east coast.) He arrives at the beach but no girl. She’s gone. No long, slow motion sprint to reunite. Nothing, only Pietrafesa's confused face, looking just as sad as we are obviously. The video flickers back to the girl and the film burns. A surprising ending to what sounds like such an upbeat, fun song. That’s life though. People don't show up where they're supposed to. Fuck it. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

INDEPENDENT SONG RELEASE: Ethos, “V: Parents”

Ethos is the stage name for Alex Hlavna, a 19-year veteran of the Cleveland, Ohio music scene where he played guitar , bass, and drums on numerous recordings. He has now released his own song entitled “V: Parents” from his new album Ten Commandments. The V is the Roman numeral for 5, as in the 5th Commandment: “Honor thy father and thy mother.”  Each track on the album is titled this way, named after a commandment. Is this some type of “religious rap” or is Ethos being metaphoric? The actual definition of “ethos” is “the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its beliefs and aspirations.” Judging from such a moniker and from statements he’s made in interviews, it seems his goal is more about making observations, rather than instructing us that “thou shalt not whatever.” It’s a more provocative approach. The song is a funk-bassline over an electronic beat and soft synths. Meanwhile Ethos ’ voice is anything but soft as he raps about honoring your

INDEPENDENT SONG RELEASE: Elise Hayes, “Giving Up”

“You never wanted me to get that tattoo,” sings Nashville recording artist Elise Hayes . “I’m going to get that tattoo.” This the start to her new single “Giving Up,” (co-written with Johnny Mo ) which is about not giving up, an ode to post-relationship defiance. There is freedom in being your own person again, even if you were the one dumped. The music itself is a tapestry of sorts: sonic styles patchworked together into a compact yet pleasing mix. Pounding drums and sitar give way to softer guitar, then back to drums, which sometimes beat rapidly as a door knock. A wake up call. The song often stops and starts as if her thoughts are coming to her in jagged fits as she’s singing them. “You never wanted me to have that haircut / Well, now I do…”   It’s a hard style to pull off but Hayes does it effortlessly. She is a strong singer/songwriter, doubtlessly helped in her confidence from being featured in TV shows, such as “Grey’s Anatomy,” MTV ’s “Siesta Key,” and other

INDEPENDENT SONG RELEASE: Micheal Bruner, "Midst of a Mistake"

By Michael Bruner Getting tendinitis was surely a setback, but it also proved to be a positive constraint, an evolution in my approach to music. Instead of contorting my hand into a tense, fleshy spider, I did what felt best: Forcing my head and body to meet halfway. I kept writing. I finished the song “Midst of a Mistake,” inspired by a thieving taxi driver in China. I wanted to start producing this song, but I knew the audio production and editing would prove too strenuous to pull off single-handedly.  Just a few weeks after returning from China, I received a message from Rodrigo Cotelo. I’d met him at the first installment of a house show I performed at (shortly after the onset of my tendinitis). He accompanied a handful of talented Jacob’s students who had backed me up on a set of my original songs. I knew Rod and I would click with each other from the moment I found him sitting at a table, pouring a gourd of yerba maté. Rod’s lively spirit, carefree attitude, and co